Guinness Beef Stew

May 20, 2012 1 Comment

The combination of flavors from the Guinness, caraway seed, and raisins come together perfectly to create a rich, complex base for this stew. A great alternative to corned beef on St. Patrick’s Day!

Preparation Instructions

Place the flour in a pie plate or other shallow dish. Sprinkle half of the beef with 1/2 teaspoon salt and dredge it in the flour. Coat the bottom of a large Dutch oven with 2 tablespoons oil and place over medium-high heat. Add the flour-coated beef to pan. Cook and stir for a few minutes until nicely browned. Remove the beef to a plate with a slotted spoon. Repeat procedure with remaining 2 tablespoons oil and remaining beef.

Add chopped onion to pan and cook, stirring occasionally for about 5 minutes or until softened. Stir in the tomato paste and cook, stirring for a minute or two. Stir in the beef broth and beer.

Return the browned beef to the pan. Stir in remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt, raisins, caraway seeds, and pepper. Increase heat and bring to a boil. Once boiling, cover, reduce heat, and simmer for 1 hour, stirring occasionally.

Uncover and bring back up to a boil. Cook 50 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the vegetables (carrot, parsnip, and potatoes). Cover and simmer for 30 minutes over medium-low heat.

Uncover and bring to a boil. Cook for an additional 10 minutes, just until vegetables are tender. Garnish with finely chopped parsley.

(Recipe adapted from Margaret Johnson’s Beef and Guinness Stew, Cooking Light 2010.)

 

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Guinness Beef Stew
Total Time: 30 minutes
Ingredients:
    ingredient 1 ingredient 2 ingredient 3 ingredient 4 ingredient 5 ingredient 6
How To Make At Home:

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Last modified on Thu 9 January 2014 1:54 pm

Filed in: Stew Recipes

Comments (1)

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  1. Travis says:

    The thing I don’t like about Cooks Illustrated is that they test and write recipes under ideal conditions — i.e., a well-equipped kitchen with lots of help on prep. Most of us don’t have those luxuries, so we learn to adapt recipes to real-world (and often less-than-ideal) kitchens. I find Cooks Illustrated recipes to be too fussy, but there are always some good tips to take away from the articles.

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