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Simple Pecan Crusted Fish with Remoulade Sauce

Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Total Time30 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: American
Servings: 4 servings

Ingredients

  • 4 fillets grouper cut about 1 inch thick
  • ½ cup butter melted, plus an extra tablespoon
  • 1 cup pecans
  • 1 tablespoon oil
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 lemon cut up into 4 wedges for garnish

Instructions

  • Start by preparing the Remoulade Sauce as described in my post.
  • Preheat the oven to 350° F.
  • In a food processor or blender, grind the pecans into the size of breadcrumbs and reserve.
  • It's always a good idea to rinse off any fresh fish you purchase at the market and it is just as important to dry it thoroughly before cooking. If the fish is not dry, there is the possibility of steaming rather than frying it.
  • Season with salt & pepper.
  • Dredge the fish fillets in the melted butter and coat them with the ground pecans. An easy way to do this is to use a plate or one of those rectangular storage containers. Be sure to coat both sides.
  • Pre-heat a fry pan large enough to hold all the fillets and able to go into the oven. If you don't have one large enough, you can cook them in batches and use a sheet pan to finish in the oven.
  • Once the pan is hot, add the tablespoon of butter and the tablespoon of oil and as soon as the butter begins to sizzle, add the fish and cook about 3 minutes per side.
  • Transfer the fry pan to the oven and finish cooking for about 8 minutes in the oven.
  • Transfer the fillets to plates along with your side dishes and lemon wedges. You can serve the remoulade sauce on the side or as I did, right on the fish. I served my grouper with roasted potatoes and Brussels sprouts.

Notes

These times are estimates because everyone's stove tops and ovens cook at variable temperatures. This means it's a good idea to get the feel of cooking fish with your equipment. In just a couple of tries, you'll have no problem telling when the fish is ready. If you need to, you can test the doneness by using a knife to tell how flaky the fish is.